Well, it’s that time of year again.  Halloween came and went in a blur and it’s dark out at five o’clock in the evening.  Thanksgiving was a whirling tornado of turkeys, sweet potatoes, brussels sprouts and oddly enough, potato latkes.  Now we are laying down our hams for Christmas, ordering geese and ducks and trying to stay warm in this unseasonably cold December weather.  I’m trying to get a bit ahead of things so we can end our year feeling caught up and as calm as possible.  Thus, I am posting cooking techniques for our Holiday Hams and Rib Roasts now.  Be sure to order yours as soon as possible as we sold out of hams and rib roasts last year well before Christmas Eve.

We wish you a very Merry, Delicious and Happy Holiday!

Easter Hams and Lambs

Holiday Ham

 

How  to heat and serve a Holiday Ham from The Local Butcher Shop

The goal is to reheat the ham without drying it out. The best way to do this is to place the ham on a wire rack in a roasting pan. Add water to the bottom of the pan and cover the whole thing tightly with foil. Bake at 275°F for 15-20 minutes per pound, until a meat thermometer registers 115°F.  Unwrap the ham and apply the glaze; increase the heat to 400°F and bake for 15-20 minutes longer until the glaze is burnished. Allow ham to rest for 10 minutes and serve with any remaining glaze on the side.

 

 

Carving a Rib Roast

Carving a Rib Roast

How to cook a Rib Roast from The Local Butcher Shop

The night before you are going to cook the rib roast, season the roast with salt and pepper to allow the seasoning to permeate the outer layer. Leave the meat uncovered in the refrigerator overnight.

Three hours before you want to begin cooking, take the roast out of the fridge, set the roast in a roasting pan with a rack.  Place the meat fat-side-down/bones up on the rack.

 

If you have 3 ribs or less:

One hour before you start roasting, pre-heat your oven to 400°F.

Once your oven is up to temperature, put the roast in the oven and roast until the meat’s internal temperature reaches 120°F (for medium rare), which will take about an hour or two depending on the size of your roast (allow approximately 10-12 minutes per pound for rare, 15-18 minutes for medium or 20 minutes per pound for a well done roast). To get the correct temperature, insert a meat thermometer into the deepest part of the meat, being careful not to hit bone.

When the roast hits 120°F, take it out of the oven and let the roast rest in the pan for 30-45 minutes, during which time the temperature will continue rising and then it will start to cool.  Once it is fully rested it is ready to slice and serve.

 

If you have 4 ribs or more:

One hour before you start roasting, pre-heat your oven to 350°F.

Once your oven is up to temperature, put the roast in the oven and roast until the meat’s internal temperature reaches 120°F (for medium rare), which will take about an hour or two depending on the size of your roast (allow approximately 10-12 minutes per pound for rare, 15-18 minutes for medium or 20 minutes per pound for a well done roast). To get the correct temperature, insert a meat thermometer into the deepest part of the meat, being careful not to hit bone.

When the roast hits 120°F, take it out of the oven and let the roast rest in the pan for 30-45 minutes, during which time the temperature will continue rising and then it will start to cool.  Once it is fully rested it is ready to slice and serve.